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Archive for the ‘Electrical Engineering’ Category

CUDA on Ubuntu Maverick Meerkat 10.10

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(To be edited)

If you’re getting errors like

/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lGL
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lGLU
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lX11
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lXi
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lXmu
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lglut

then you need to do the following

sudo apt-get install libxi libxi-dev

Running make again will result in the following errors:

/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lGL
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lGLU
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lXmu
/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lglut

Now, let’s execute:

sudo apt-get install freeglut3 freeglut3-dev

This brings down the errors to

/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lXmu

So, we just have to do one more apt-get:

sudo apt-get install libxmu6 libxmu-dev

—-
If you get errors suggesting that your libcudart.so.1 is missing, it means your LD_CONFIG_PATH isn’t set right. To set it permanently, use

sudo ldconfig -v /usr/local/cuda/lib64/

on a 64-bit system and

sudo ldconfig -v /usr/local/cuda/lib/

on a 32 bit system.

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Written by Vivek

January 25, 2011 at 22:49

CUDA on a Dell XPS 15 in Windows 7 64-bit

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I just figured out how to get NVIDIA CUDA to work on my laptop. You need to replace the generic Dell driver with this one:

266.58_notebook_winvista_win7_64bit_international_whql.exe

You need to do a custom clean installation and make sure the PhysX box is checked.

I had to do some CUDA programming on the Windows partition, so now I have to figure out how to configure all my IDEs to work with CUDA. I will try and post detailed configuration info for Netbeans at least.

Written by Vivek

January 22, 2011 at 11:07

Thermal Noise Engines

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I just stumbled upon an interesting paper today on arXiv, from a researcher at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Texas A&M University. I am copying the abstract entry on the pre-print archive below.

Thermal noise engines

Authors:Laszlo B. Kish
(Submitted on 29 Sep 2010 (v1), last revised 20 Oct 2010 (this version, v5))

Electrical heat engines driven by the Johnson-Nyquist noise of resistors are introduced. They utilize Coulomb’s law and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical physics that is the reverse phenomenon of heat dissipation in a resistor. No steams, gases, liquids, photons, combustion, phase transition, or exhaust/pollution are present here. In these engines, instead of heat reservoirs, cylinders, pistons and valves, resistors, capacitors and switches are the building elements. For the best performance, a large number of parallel engines must be integrated to run in a synchronized fashion and the characteristic size of the elementary engine must be at the 10 nanometers scale. At room temperature, in the most idealistic case, a two-dimensional ensemble of engines of 25 nanometer characteristic size integrated on a 2.5×2.5cm silicon wafer with 12 Celsius temperature difference between the warm-source and the cold-sink would produce a specific power of about 0.4 Watt. Regular and coherent (correlated-cylinder states) versions are shown and both of them can work in either four-stroke or two-stroke modes. The coherent engines have properties that correspond to coherent quantum heat engines without the presence of quantum coherence. In the idealistic case, all these engines have Carnot efficiency, which is the highest possible efficiency of any heat engine,without violating the second law of thermodynamics.

Direct Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1009.5942

This is a very interesting paper. Who knows what the future has in store for us…quantum thermal power stations?

Written by Vivek

October 23, 2010 at 00:20